Ukraine Crisis: Here is What We Are Doing

UKRAINE CRISIS:

HOW WE ARE HELPING UKRAINIAN PEOPLE WHO ARE FLEEING WAR

As the war in Ukraine escalates, we want to be sure we are there for the Ukrainian people.

As in any war, it is civilians who pay the highest price. Whether it be victims of fighting, or the millions of people who are forced to leave the country in search of safety.
Our teams are currently working on several projects for the victims of the war in Ukraine: providing assistance to refugees in Moldova and Italy, and delivering medicine and medical supplies to hospitals in Kyiv.

How We’re Helping In Moldova

Our Politruck, a mobile health clinic, is operating in the city of Bălți, offering health assistance to people fleeing from the war in Ukraine.

The Politruck is the largest of EMERGENCY’s mobile clinics: it is equipped with a waiting room, two outpatient clinics and a station for psychological counselling and mediation.

Our team, made up of doctors, nurses, psychologists, mediators and logisticians, guarantees first aid and psychological assistance mainly to the elderly, women and children who are arriving from Ukraine in these days.

How We Are Helping in Ukraine

We sent hospital supplies to Ukraine, based on tailored requests made by local facilities.

How We’re Helping in Italy

We are running several projects dedicated to people fleeing the war in Ukraine, and arriving in Italy.

In Milan, we provide them with social and health orientation services, including Covid-19 swabs performance, and food support.

In the Outpatient Clinics run by our healthcare  programme, we are offering support in registering with the National Health Service and guidance on health and social services in the area.

“Our contribution must be effective. We must ensure our experience working in the midst of conflict is useful to those in need.
EMERGENCY wants to be there for the Ukrainian people.”

Rossella Miccio, president of EMERGENCY

OUR UPDATES

An Update From Our Staff in Moldova.

30 APRIL 2022

N. Only Draws Moving Cars and A House to Leave From.
He arrived here in Bălți, Moldova, after a three-day journey from Ukraine together with five of his six siblings. At the wheel is his mother, A.

When we visit her in our Mobile Clinic, she says she has a bad headache and wants to be sure it’s nothing serious: she has to be healthy and feel well to be able to look after everyone. She is tired, the journey has been “unspeakable”, and she is still carrying everything that she left with.

“I haven’t heard from my husband or son for three days. I broke the rule we made when we left: that they would look for us, that we should not call. But I couldn’t stick to it. I called and got no answer. I tell my children that I’m sure they’re fine. But I wonder how they can believe me if I can’t even believe myself.”

A. thanks us because she has found a “safe place” where she can cry and vent her anguish without fear of falling apart.

– Giovanna, EMERGENCY’s psychologist, is part of the EMERGENCY team in Moldova. At the Mobile Clinic, in Bălți, we offer primary medical and nursing care and a psychological support service to refugees fleeing the war in Ukraine.

14 APRIL 2022

Federica is one of our doctors here: “Many people are coming – especially women over 60 – with chronic diseases and treatments that have stopped because of the war. They’ve had to move away from their homes, where they had a general practitioner who was their point of reference. Now they are having establish the continuity of care all over again.”

Federica’s daily activities are supported by nurse Caterina. “We have drugs for acute problems, painkillers, anti-inflammatory drugs, but also for chronic pathologies that we are seeing in the patients who come to our clinic.”
Caterina splits her role with Alexandra, a 20-year-old Moldovan nurse who has just enrolled.
In these tragic circumstances, EMERGENCY is providing psychological support too. “We are committed to this project,” says Andrea, our coordinator on the ground, “EMERGENCY is supporting the social and medical needs of the victims of this war.”

06 APRIL 2022

We are in Bălți, the second most populous city in the country, which is now home to three refugee centres.

Our Mobile Clinic is currently located in front a reception centre currently hosting 200 people, and is also available to all refugees being housed in private homes and other facilities.

Andrea Bellardinelli, head of EMERGENCY’s Migration and Emergencies programme, is on the ground: “When we launched medical activities here in Bălți, our Mobile Clinic received mainly adult patients, often elderly people with chronic illnesses, and people in need of psychological support. Those that have fled the conflict are going through an extremely difficult moment of great emotional stress and anxiety. Anxiety about what will happen, anxiety thinking about their loved ones left behind in Ukraine, and also mental and physical exhaustion.”


Video
©️ Davide Preti

As this crisis evolves, we are working with the Moldovan authorities to further strengthen our presence and services. We will be here as long as we need to be.

17 MARCH 2022

Our colleagues Gianfilippo, Maya and Adolfo show us the Politruck, the largest of our outpatients mobile clinics, equipped with a waiting room, two outpatient clinics and a station for psychological counselling and mediation.

11 MARCH 2022

Our Politruck, the largest of EMERGENCY’s Mobile Outpatient Clinics, has left for Moldova.

It will reach the ground to offer healthcare assistance to thousands of people – elderly, women and children- who are fleeing from the war in Ukraine. In this first phase of EMERGENCY’s intervention, our field team will provide nursing care, basic medicine and psychological assistance.

 

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We will treat chronically ill patients, while being prepared to handle any Covid-19 outbreaks. Thanks to the Mobile Outpatient Clinic, we will be able to operate in various places, and to promptly respond to any needs that may arise from this unpredictable situation.
We are committed to being there for Ukraine people.

9 MARCH 2022
From the Ukrainian border.

“We are in Moldova.

One of our first stops was Chisinau. The city is welcoming people in camps equipped for initial reception, the largest of which is a sports hall that can host about 800 people.

People seem to be in a good state of health but the elderly and chronically ill are facing difficulties in being able to follow their treatment, as always happens in emergency circumstances like these. Prevention from Covid-19 infection is a problem here in a population that is poorly vaccinated and living in close proximity.

EMERGENCY is working with the authorities to understand how to begin a health intervention involving our doctors, nurses and cultural mediators. The first step is to register EMERGENCY in Moldova in order to be recognised and contribute aid.

Meanwhile, we also went to two border posts yesterday, to see the arrivals’ situation. Palanca, the furthest border near Odessa, is 170 kilometres from the capital, and so far has been one of the main arrival points for refugees from the Ukrainian war.

Minibuses, cars, buses are all ready to take people to Chisinau or directly to Romania, Germany and Poland. Almost everyone leaves quickly, but the authorities have set up a small camp of about 300 people for people who still don’t know where to go or cannot make it.

It hurts to see the elderly staying behind so as not to be a burden on their families. This is what war is like.”
– Andrea, EMERGENCY staff, from Moldova

7 MARCH 2022
An EMERGENCY team is on Ukraine’s borders with Romania and Moldova to assess humanitarian needs and evaluate potential projects to provide care to those affected by the conflict.

“We are assessing all possibilities for EMERGENCY’s intervention both inside and on the borders of Ukraine,” says Rossella Miccio, president of EMERGENCY. “Our contribution must be effective. We must ensure our experience working in the midst of conflict is useful to those in need.

EMERGENCY wants to be there for the Ukrainian people.”

Andrea is part of our team on the ground. He tells us that there is a sense of solidarity and significant presence of aid organisations, but “the flow of people crossing the border does not stop.”

“The flow is silent and dignified. People are shocked: there can be no other reaction to such brutality. I talk to ‘V’, who has just crossed the border. ‘It’s terrible what’s happening,’ he tells me. His eyes bear the signs of incredulity in the face of war.”